Old Korea's/Chosan
1897 Stamp Issuance Schedule

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This Issuance Schedule utilizes stamp pages from Korea's Postal Museum Web Site.

Clicking on high-lighted Stamp No./s, activates a link to  KSS-KorBase;
if available.

STAMP NO./s DATE
ISSUED
TOPIC DESCRIPTION STAMPS
ISSUED
REMARKS
7A 10.14
1897
5 Poon stamp;
Overprinted with "Tae-han" in red & black
1  
8A 10.14.
1897
10 Poon stamp;
Overprinted with "Tae-han" in red & black
1  
9A 10.14
1897
25 Poon stamp;
Overprinted with "Tae-han" in red & black
1  
10 10.14
1897
50 Poon stamp;
Overprinted with "Tae-han"
1  

Extracted from, "Stanley Gibbons, Stamp Catalogue, Part 18":
King Kojang declared Korea to be an empire, under the name of "Tai-han", on 12 October 1897, and was crowned Emperor Kwangmu on October 17, 1897.

All four stamps are known with the "Tai-han" overprint in black ink. All major stamp catalogues value the black overprinted stamps at about 5 times more than the red overprinted stamps.

Extracted from Korean Kingdom and Empire Philatelic Catalog and Handbook; by Dr. James W. Kerr:
Overprinted by:   Local Postmasters, and by the Printing Bureau of the Ministry of Agriculure and Industry.
Notes (1)   mixed inkings of red plus black, giving pink or brown, plus double overprints of red on black, black on red. Oriental stamp pad ink is usually vermillion, made with cinnabar. It may shade to carmine because of oil additives. If plate was not cleaned between uses of red and black ink, overprint color "varieties" resulted. These "browns" etc. are of no consequence and deserve no special note or price.
Notes (13)    12 October 1897 was start of "Tai Han" era. ROK reports issue as of 14 October 1897. Earliest cancelled copies, 25 February 1898.

All major stamp catalogues list and number the overprinted stamps by whichever printing they were originally produced: 1st printing 07.22.1895. 2nd printing 1896-1898; and by whichever color (red or black) of the overprint.



Table of different overprint styles
Extracted from Korean Postage Stamp Catalogue

Extracted from, "Stanley Gibbons, Stamp Catalogue, Part 18":
When the supply of stamps overprinted by typography was exhausted, post offices were alowed to produce their own overprints. In the larger offices handstamps were used, of which four main types are known. In the handstampng process the bottom character was sometimes omitted, characters are found inverted or double, and characters of different colours may be found on the same stamp. Handstamps in brown were caused by change from a black to a red inkpad. In smaller offices the characters were written by brush. Stamps with these handwritten characters are rare.

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